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Incredible photos of US Marines learning how to survive in the jungle during one of Asia’s biggest military exercises

Chaiwat Subprasom/REUTERSA US Marine eats a scorpion as part of a survival exercise during Cobra Gold 2010.The US-led annual

multinational military exercise Cobra Gold kicked off in Thailand on Monday, despite a faltering relationship between the two countries following Thailand’s military coup in May 2014. 
Cobra Gold 2015 is scaled down due compared to past years because of the frosty relations between Thailand’s ruling military junta and the US. But it’s still a massive military exercise even in a reduced form. This year 13,000 personnel from 7 participating nations have joined in the exercises, the AP reports.
The participant countries are Thailand, the United States, Singapore, Japan, Indonesia, Republic of Korea and Malaysia, while India and China are taking part in humanitarian training missions. Even though the exercise is smaller than in the past, the scope of Cobra Gold has grown since the first one was held in 1982 and involved only the US and Thailand.
Exercises in Cobra Gold 2015 include jungle survival training and civic assistance programs in underdeveloped regions of Thailand.
Survival training is a big part of Cobra Gold. Thai Marines demonstrate how to capture a cobra in the wild.
Cpl. Isaac Ibarra/USMC
US Marines then help decapitate the cobra and take turns drinking its blood. Cobra blood is surprisingly hydrating and can be used as a temporary replacement for water if a Marine is lost without supplies.
Cpl. Isaac Ibarra/USMC
Thai Marines also teach their counterparts how to recognize edible jungle fruits.
Cpl. Isaac Ibarra/USMC
Like cobra blood, several of the fruits can serve as an improvised source of hydration.
Cpl. Isaac Ibarra/USMC
Marines are also instructed in the proper way to eat scorpions and spiders. Spiders are eaten after their fangs are ripped off, while scorpions are edible once the stinger is removed.
Cpl. Isaac Ibarra/USMC
Aside from survival lessons, participant countries also take part in construction projects to build greater regional cooperation in the event of disasters like typhoons or plane crashes. Here, Chinese and US soldiers work together to build a school as part of Cobra Gold 2015.
Cpl. James Marchetti/US Pacific Command

SEE ALSO: 
Here’s a US Marine killing a chicken with his teeth


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