Brian Brown's Official Website

Sponsored by

Brian Recommands

Sponsored by

One of Brian’s Favorite Quotes

There are no secrets better kept than the secrets that everybody guesses.”
— George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)
 Mrs. Warren’s Profession, 1893, Act III

Anzac Day 2015: Anzacs remembered in moving commemoration services in …

Updated

April 25, 2015 14:19:19


Photo:

Prrince Charles lays a wreath during the dawn ceremony at Anzac Cove. (Reuters: Osman Orsal)


Photo:

A lone piper plays as wreaths are laid at the dawn service at Anzac Cove. (ABC News: Tim Leslie)


Photo:

Prime Minister Tony Abbott and New Zealand prime minister John Key pay their respects after laying wreaths during the dawn service at Anzac Cove in Gallipoli. (ABC News)


Photo:

Australian attend the dawn service at Anzac Cove on the Gallipoli peninsula. (AFP: Tolga Bozoglu)


Photo:

A man waits for the dawn service to start at Anzac Cove. (ABC News: Tim Leslie)


Photo:

People sleep out in sleeping bags the night before the dawn service. (ABC News: Tim Leslie)


Photo:

People gather at Anzac Cove on the night before the 100th anniversary of the Gallipoli landings. (Tim Leslie)


Photo:

People wait at Anzac Cove at dusk, preparing to spend the night to rise for the dawn service. (ABC News: Tim Leslie)


Photo:
Two young men hold an Australian flag at Gallipoli on the evening before the dawn service. (Tim Leslie)


Photo:

A young woman huddles in her sleeping bag at Gallipoli on the evening before the dawn service. (Tim Leslie)


Photo:

Security personnel with automatic rifles watch over proceedings from the roof of bus.


Photo:

Visitors prepare for Anzac Day centenary commemorations on the Gallipoli peninsula. (ABC News: Tim Leslie)


Photo:

Turkish soldiers dressed in WWI costume sit on horseback at Gallipoli. (ABC News: Tim Leslie)

Gallery:
Anzac centenary services in Gallipoli and Villiers-Bretonneux

Prime Minister Tony Abbott, New Zealand prime minister John Key and Prince Charles have delivered moving tributes at the centenary service at Anzac Cove in Gallipoli, where Australian and New Zealand soldiers landed 100 years ago.Commemoration services have been held around the world, including at Bullecourt and Villiers-Bretonneux in France, where Australian soldiers halted the German offensive on the Somme and helped turn the course of the war in 1918.Mr Abbott said the Anzac soldiers were ordinary men who did “extraordinary things”.”They lived with death and dined with disease because that was where their duty lay,” he said.”In volunteering to serve, they became more than soldiers — they became the founding heroes of modern Australia.”If they had not been emblematic of the nation we thought we were, Anzac Day would not have been commemorated from that time until this, in every part of our country, in every place where Australians gather and in every military base where Australians serve. “If they were not still emblematic of the nation we think we are, none of us would be here. “But like every generation since, we are here on Gallipoli because we believe that the Anzacs represented Australians at our best.”Over 8,000 Australians and 2,000 New Zealanders travelled to Gallipoli for the service at Anzac Cove. Official representatives of 360 countries involved in the Gallipoli campaign — including some 100 from Turkey — were also in attendance and laid wreaths.The service included a didgeridoo performance by Indigenous performer William Barton.Anzacs ‘tormented’ by thought of leaving comrades behindAbout 50,000 Australians fought at Gallipoli. Nearly 18,000 were wounded and more than 8,700 were killed.Over 500,000 troops from the Ottoman Empire were involved in the Gallipoli campaign. More than 150,000 were wounded and over 80,000 killed.Prince Charles, who laid the first wreath at Anzac Cove, said many Anzacs who were evacuated were distressed that the bodies of their comrades had been left behind.”When the Anzacs finally left this place, they were tormented by the thought of leaving their comrades behind, that their suffering and loss would be forgotten, that their graves would lie untendered,” he said.”Lieutenant Ken Miller of the 2nd Battalion wrote, ‘There was the question of our dead mates. We lived at Gallipoli with our dead alongside us. “Owing to the lack of space our cemeteries were always under our eyes. The hardest feature of the evacuation was in leaving those dead comrades behind’.”New Zealand prime minister John Key said it was important to remember the sacrifices made by the Anzacs.”The campaign waged here ensured that the name of this place would be written into the histories of New Zealand, Australia, Britain, Turkey and the many other countries that fought here never to be erased,” he said.”Gallipoli symbolises, too, the pity of war, because while this was a place of courage and heroism and duty, it was also a place of fear and waste and loss. “It was a place where soldiers lived in the jungle of trenches just metres apart from the opposing side and constantly under fire. “It was a place of unspeakable suffering on both sides of the fighting. The generosity of Turkey in welcoming us back here year after year means that Gallipoli also symbolises the healing power of time, forgiveness and diplomacy.”

Topics:

anzac-day,

world-war-1,

history,

turkey,

australia

First posted

April 25, 2015 14:02:52


Link to this story: 

Please share with your friends:

Leave a Reply

Sponsored by

Brian Recommends

Sponsored by